Swiss Army Knives Are Better Off Not Multi-Tasking

Boredom is underrated. It’s natural for us to want every level of our focus chomping at the bit of the stimuli that flies back and forth between our senses. Sometimes, it just seems like a good use of time to lock into light chore-doing while finishing up that project you said you’d send right about now. Being attentive to when the laundry will finish, responding to the messages of person X, Y, and Z, and leaning your ear towards the yelps that your animal friend is making from across the room are all examples of acts that detract from the amount of undisturbed time you can allow the different tiers of your mind to wander. Letting your brain sink into a roaming state is essential for muse-chasing, and the antithesis (being reactive) is for mechanical chore-doing. Engineering things into reality requires a delicate combination of both.

“The answer is always changing, but it always dances between taking care of the physical body and shutting off all stimuli that has nothing to do with the task at hand.”

Throughout the second half of 2018, I was definitely doing more than what I initially set out to do at the year’s start. From touring with Robotaki, Mothica, Omniboi, and members of the Ruby Yacht (Pink Navel & Artie Do Good), releasing an album as Tsar of Gamble, coordinating events and releases through Fleet: 00 (my home team), working on singles, storyboarding and editing music videos, and bringing all of this to the attention of whoever it may concern via the Internet (while usually being in transit), I had to revamp my ability to hone in on tasks without exhausting my health. The answer is always changing, but it always dances between taking care of the physical body, and shutting off all stimuli that has nothing to do with the task at hand. Cal Newport’s ‘Deep Work’ is a read that presented a lot of info to me at what seemed like the perfect time. Different tasks require different types and tiers of thought processes, and without pinning any importance of hierarchy on anything, some processes just cost more than others.

“I think of our bodies as tool belts, and every person is a custom Swiss Army Knife…Knowing where and how to concentrate your focus is apart of knowing how to use your tool belt efficiently.”

The brain is useful for receiving and transmitting lots o’ different things. I think of our bodies as tool belts, and every person is a custom Swiss Army Knife. The metal is malleable too, which is super dope. Knowing where and how to focus your focus is apart of knowing how to use your toolbelt efficiently. For myself, shutting off all stimuli besides whatever I’m writing to helps a lot with allowing me to both roam and be reactive. That includes turning off everything that has the ability to make an audible ping, closing the door, and sitting through brief moments of stimulation withdrawal (boredom) between ideas. As for the chores, I’m still very prone to over-rinsing episodes of whatever it is that I might be into between laundry loads. I guess I’m willing to bite tha non-lethal bullet on those for now, but at least it’s being bitten after everything else gets done. Also, I feel the need to mention that taking breaths is important and good.

Header Photo: ahotelparty

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